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WATCH: Specialist team called in to Nairn and Ardersier after unexploded WWII bombs were found by a woman walking in the area


By Louise Glen

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A BOMB disposal unit were called in by Nairn Coastguard Rescue Team after a member of the public found an unexploded ordinance device on Tuesday afternoon (September 7).

The specialist Ministry of Defence unit, known as the Explosive Ordnance Disposal and Search Regiment Royal Logistic Corps (EOD), exploded 25 ordnances on Wednesday afternoon on Arderier beach and at the beach at Culbin.

Coastguard team leader Tom Rennie thanked the woman who made the initial call.

He said: "We were alerted to a unexploded ordnance at Culbin by a member of the public."
Explaining that a high number of devices are found in the area due to Culbin and Ardersier being used as part of the training for the D-Day Landings in World War Two.

Large ordnance devices are known as barrage rockets, and the smaller ones known as mortar rounds.

In all 25 mortar round devices were found by the Coastguard and EOD team, and a larger barrage rocket was also seen in the sea.

He said: "We ask people to be very careful as it is 75 years since these devices were left along the coastline, and we just do not know how they will react.

"So we ask people who think they have seen one to phone 999, and ask for the Coastguard. I don't mind that we are called out to these, we want to keep people safe. Even if it is a false alarm we are happy to be called out."
Mr Rennie said a few years ago, a dog picked one up and was running on the beach with it in it's mouth.

Tom Rennie invented the Bomb Stick to send an accurate photo of the size of the device to the EOD & Search Regiment Royal Logistic Corps.
Tom Rennie invented the Bomb Stick to send an accurate photo of the size of the device to the EOD & Search Regiment Royal Logistic Corps.

The dog eventually gave it up, and it was given over to the EOD team.

He said: "I invented a bomb stick, that helps us identify the size of the bomb. When we are called, we make the area safe and then we take a photograph of the ordnance and I sent it off to the EOD team.

"When they saw this bomb they said they wanted to deal with it, and came the following day.

"While we were waiting for them to arrive we kept a cordon around the devices. The larger one in the water was largely submerged so we did not have to stand by that one.

25 ordinance devices were found between Ardersier and Culbin.
25 ordinance devices were found between Ardersier and Culbin.

"The EOD managed the explosions, which were quite spectacular. Altogether 25 ordnances were detonated, and the other one in the sea was exploded in a controlled area.

"The noise of the explosion was heard as far away as Findhorn and Inverness."

Mr Rennie advised anyone who comes across what they believe to be an ordnance or unexploded bomb not to hesitate in calling 999 and asking for the Coastguard.

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