Home   News   Article

Is Nessie the r-eel deal? Hunters will continue visiting Loch Ness


By Val Sweeney

Get the Inverness Courier sent to your inbox every week and swipe through an exact replica of the day's newspaper



Professor Neil Gemmell and Nesie hunter Steve Feltham. Picture: Callum Mackay
Professor Neil Gemmell and Nesie hunter Steve Feltham. Picture: Callum Mackay

NESSIE hunters have vowed to continue their search for the elusive resident of Loch Ness after scientists declared the creature could be a giant eel.

Following investigations into environmental DNA present in the water, the team yesterday announced to the world’s media there was no definitive evidence of a prehistoric-type marine reptile such as a plesiosaur.

Nor did the findings, based on 250 samples of water, reveal evidence of catfish, sturgeon or shark, which are sometimes thought to be behind reported sightings of the Loch Ness Monster.

The Inverness Courier reported on a possible sighting of Nessie back in 1933.
The Inverness Courier reported on a possible sighting of Nessie back in 1933.

However, the team, led by Professor Neil Gemmell, a geneticist from the University of Otago in New Zealand, also found no evidence of seals and otters – which are known to frequent the loch.

With the Loch Ness Monster estimated to be worth nearly £41 million a year to the Scottish economy, Nessie hunters and local tourist leaders have declared the findings inconclusive.

Steve Feltham, who has lived at Dores beach in a converted mobile library since 1991, acknowledged one of his own Nessie theories – possibly a catfish – had been dismissed.

“What is not dismissed is that thousands of people have reported seeing the back of something,” said Mr Feltham, who is recognised by the Guinness Book of Records for carrying out the longest search for the Loch Ness Monster.

Full story in today's Inverness Courier.

Related article: Report of strange spectacle on Loch Ness in 1933 leaves unanswered question – what was it?


Do you want to respond to this article? If so, click here to submit your thoughts and they may be published in print.


Get a digital copy of the Inverness Courier delivered straight to your inbox every week allowing you to swipe through an exact replica of the day's newspaper - it looks just like it does in print!

SUBSCRIBE NOW


This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More
');