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Rainbow of hope shines over Kirkhill Community Centre thanks to student's initiative


By Neil MacPhail

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Angus with his mother Victoria display the Rainbow of Hope before it is fixed to the wall in Kirkhill Community Centre.
Angus with his mother Victoria display the Rainbow of Hope before it is fixed to the wall in Kirkhill Community Centre.

AN Inverness schoolboy has used the community spirit engendered by the Covid crisis as part of his Duke of Edinburgh Award project and at the same time raised money for the local hall.

During the first lockdown, Charleston Academy pupil Angus Franklin (16) put forward a proposal to Kirkhill Community Centre trustees.

His plan was to organise local people to create a Rainbow of Hope to let villagers know that one day there would be an end to the global pandemic that has touched the whole of society.

Angus said: “Every household in Kirkhill and the surrounding areas was invited to take a coloured fabric rectangle and make a donation in return if they could, and decorate it as a memory of their Covid experience using fabric paint or pens, embroidery, buttons etc.

“Our community delivered with flying colours during the crisis, creating services such as the community cupboard, caring for neighbours, family and friends and supporting the NHS and key workers in a myriad of ways. To commemorate this time of loving humanity, the proposal was for a fun community project, to remind us of all the good that surfaced during this period of uncertainty.”

The Rainbow of Hope in position.
The Rainbow of Hope in position.

The felt squares have now been sewn together with the help of Angus’s family, creating an enormous colourful hanging for the hall.

Trustee board member Cris Ford said: “Angus saw the plan as marking the year 2020 in a positive way that gives us something to remind us in the future how our community pulled together during the Covid crisis.

“Our hope is to have a village tea party once we are all free to mix again and which will allow the community to see the wall hanging and come together to celebrate the end of the Covid crisis and thank the community for their efforts.”



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