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Drumnadrochit locals enjoyed a series of films that are a true testament to the area's history


By Imogen James


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The team behind the magic: Nicky MacLennan, David Fraser, Bethan Luscombe-Smith, Chris Grant, Connie Maclennan, Chris Dell and Amanda Luscombe-Smith. Picture: Gary Anthony
The team behind the magic: Nicky MacLennan, David Fraser, Bethan Luscombe-Smith, Chris Grant, Connie Maclennan, Chris Dell and Amanda Luscombe-Smith. Picture: Gary Anthony

THE history of a Highland glen was shown through a series of six films last Friday after years of restoration and planning.

Led by David Fraser, Glen Urquhart locals created the films to coincide with the restoration of mausoleum and graveyard Cnocan Burraidh in Drumnadrochit.

The ambitious project started in 1998 when Mr Fraser decided to restore the 300-year-old site and the Glen Urquhart Community Council received £63,000 for the works when the project was revisited in 2019.

It took two years and the help of more than 50 volunteers, but Cnocan Burraidh is now open for visitors to come and admire the final resting place of the Grants of Shewglie.

Conservator Karolina Allan, community councillor David Fraser and Nicky MacLennan of Soirbheas.
Conservator Karolina Allan, community councillor David Fraser and Nicky MacLennan of Soirbheas.

The films were directed and written by Amanda Luscombe-Smith and move through time from colonialism and the battle of Coire Buidhe to the history of shinty and modern day Drumnadrochit.

Mrs Luscombe-Smith said she enjoyed giving back to the community through the films, which her daughter acts in.

“It starts with Cnocan Burriadh and what it is, how it begins” she said. “It’s changed the skyline really in this little area and become a predominant thing where people can go to now.

Conservator Karolina Allan working on central mausoleum.
Conservator Karolina Allan working on central mausoleum.

“It’s a brilliant way of giving back to somewhere you’re living and to learn so much about where you live.”

Nicky MacLennan, assistant community development officer at Soirbheas, has been involved in the project from the start.

She said: “I love heritage and culture. To me, it’s about making sure we don’t lose all of that history. All of these stories are so interesting and it’s about making sure the community come together.”

Mr Fraser said: “You really want people to be immersed in the place and that’s where our heritage is so important.

“That’s why going from restoring the walls to creating a heritage project has added so much value.”


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