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Downloads and streaming: New stuff to watch at home


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Finn Cole as Joseph Kearney, Dean-Charles Chapman as Matthew Connolly and Ferdia Walsh-Peelo as Rez in Here Are the Young Men. Picture: PA Photo/TYM Films Dac/Gerry Balfe Smyth.
Finn Cole as Joseph Kearney, Dean-Charles Chapman as Matthew Connolly and Ferdia Walsh-Peelo as Rez in Here Are the Young Men. Picture: PA Photo/TYM Films Dac/Gerry Balfe Smyth.

A selection of new homeviewing and DVD options.

Here Are The Young Men (Cert 15, 96 mins)

Available from April 30 on Amazon Prime Video/BT TV Store/iTunes/Sky Store/TalkTalk TV Store and other download and streaming services, available from May 10 on DVD

In June 2003, Matthew Connolly (Dean-Charles Chapman) leaves school in Dublin with the words of headmaster Mr Landerton (Ralph Ineson) ringing in his ears: “Be careful with your choices”.

The lad responds just exactly how you would expect him to, or not, depending on how your own schooldays played out, by breaking into the school with best friends Kearney (Finn Cole) and Rez (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo), spray-painting graffiti in one of the classrooms and vandalising the headmaster’s car.

During a final summer of freedom before reality bites, Matthew lusts after free-spirited friend Jen (Anya Taylor-Joy) and Kearney dreams of moving to America to work on a construction site with his older brother Dwayne (Chris Newman): “It’s gonna be deadly, man!”

Meanwhile, Rez pops pills to try to feel something, anything, to lift him out of a nihilistic gloom.

When the three lads witness a senseless tragedy while high on drugs, they tumble down a rabbit hole of violence and self-destruction.

Based on Rob Doyle’s novel, Here Are The Young Men is a gritty coming of age story soaked in the testosterone and youthful exuberance of the lead characters.

Frenetic camerawork and nightmarish fantasy sequences involving a maniacal TV presenter (Travis Fimmel) conjure a hallucinogenic waking dream that writer-director Eoin Macken’s script struggles to support with a coherent narrative.

A booming soundtrack of The Chemical Brothers, Joy Division and Primal Scream evokes the era as characters whirl out of control in a thick haze of depression and paranoia.

Taylor-Joy’s spunky go-getter is frequently the only ray of light but director Macken snuffs that out to belabour signposted tragedy.

The Disciple (Cert 12, 128 mins)

Streaming from April 30 exclusively on Netflix

Boasting Oscar winner Alfonso Cuaron as an executive producer, director Chaitanya Tamhane’s Marathi-language drama explores Hindustani music traditions and one man’s quest for perfection.

Twenty-something Indian classical music vocalist Sharad Nerulkar (Aditya Modak) has followed in the footsteps of his father (Kiran Yadnyopavit), studying recordings of mercurial teacher Maai (Sumitra Bhave) to achieve artistic fulfilment.

Sharad’s guru (Dr Arun Dravid) helps his student chase that dream as a Khayal vocalist, which demands total focussed dedication, at the expense of all personal relationships.

Sharad’s job selling CDs of Hindustani musicians for Kishore (Makarand Mukund) keeps him fully focused on his craft, to the consternation of his loving grandmother (Neela Khedkar), who fears that the perfection Sharad seeks is ultimately unattainable.

City Of Lies (Cert 15, 111 mins)

Available from May 3 on Amazon Prime Video/BT TV Store/iTunes/Sky Store/TalkTalk TV Store and other download and streaming services

Director Brad Furman’s 2018 crime thriller, based on Randall Sullivan’s non-fiction book LAbyrinth, is finally released in the UK after a turbulent behind-the-scenes history.

Rappers Tupac Shakur and The Notorious B.I.G. are killed six months apart in drive-by shootings, and Los Angeles detective Russell Poole (Johnny Depp) works the homicide investigation, determined to unmask the perpetrators of the shocking crimes.

Despite his best efforts, however, Poole retires from the force unable to solve the cases.

More than two decades after the murders, reporter Jack Jackson (Forest Whitaker) embarks on a new crusade to discover the truth about the notorious shootings.

He joins forces with Poole to sift through the evidence and pursue new lines of inquiry.

Love Fraud

4 episodes, streaming from April 30 exclusively on Amazon Prime Video

To love and be loved is a basic human desire.

However, some unscrupulous souls have no hesitation in exploiting this primal need for personal gain.

Carla takes action in Love Fraud. Picture: PA Photo/Showtime/Alex Takats
Carla takes action in Love Fraud. Picture: PA Photo/Showtime/Alex Takats

In this fascinating four-part documentary, the victims of one man, Richard Scott Smith, band together to exact revenge after he uses the internet to con them out of money over a period of 20 years.

When the criminal justice system fails the innocent women, who were just looking for love, they involve a bounty hunter to hunt down Smith.

The story unfolds in real time, revealing the tactics used by Smith to charm and beguile his targets and their cleverly co-ordinated response to his cruel deception.


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