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Easy to follow tips for garden newbies


By Features Reporter


If you’ve never had a garden before, it’s a real revelation when you finally move into somewhere with a patch of grass to call your own – space to potter around in, barbecues in the summer and drinks in the fading evening light.

But for people who’ve never so much as bought a pair of garden gloves and pulled a weed out, suddenly having to care for and nurture a garden year-round can be daunting. So before the autumn threatens to dump an additional leaf problem on your garden, here are some of the simplest ways you can take control of your new patch of land.

BBC Gardeners' World presenter Mark Lane. Picture: Mark Lane/PA
BBC Gardeners' World presenter Mark Lane. Picture: Mark Lane/PA

BBC Gardeners’ World presenter Mark Lane shares his advice for newbies:

1. Don’t do anything right away

Wait and see where the sun rises and sets, where the shade lies, where the wind blows, and if you are moving into an established garden, what plants come up before you change anything.

2. Check your soil

The easiest thing to do is buy a pH soil tester at your local garden centre. This will establish whether your soil is acidic, neutral or alkaline, to work out which plants will thrive.

Garden centres will usually signpost which plants like which soils to make buying easy.

3. Know when to mow

How often you mow will depend on the time of year and the weather.

If in doubt, mow once a week during spring and autumn, and twice weekly during summer – although once a week from spring to autumn may suffice. Mowing is not necessary during winter.

Aim to cut no more than a third of the leaf blade, and don’t set the mower too low or scalp the turf.

4. Plant in groups

Keep things simple and aim to plant in blocks of three, five or seven of the same type of plant to create wonderful blocks of colour and texture.

Mulch after planting by covering the soil with a 5cm layer of compost around the base of the new plants. Then water well.

5. Sow seeds

If you’re on a tight budget, sow seeds. Follow the instructions on the packets as to how you prepare your soil, and you can create an almost instant garden for around £10.

6. Start with easy-to-grow veg and herbs

Lettuce is an easy vegetable to grow for beginner gardeners. Picture: iStock/PA
Lettuce is an easy vegetable to grow for beginner gardeners. Picture: iStock/PA

If you fancy yourself as a bit of a kitchen gardener, radish, carrots and lettuce are the quickest and simplest to grow. Oregano is great for cooking and attracting wildlife.

Generally, herbs like a gritty compost so add plenty of horticultural grit when planting, while vegetables prefer nutrient-rich soils with no stones.

7. Flowers aren’t tricky either

Sunflowers are a good flower for beginners to start with. Picture: iStock/PA
Sunflowers are a good flower for beginners to start with. Picture: iStock/PA

Herbaceous perennials (a plant whose growth dies down annually but whose roots or other underground parts survive) like nutrient-rich soils that will not dry out with a pH of 6.5.

Wildflowers like low-nutrient soil (i.e. the subsoil) and most will grow with a neutral pH7.

8. Choose easy-to-care-for shrubs

Abelia x grandiflora flowers from June to September and is a wonderful evergreen shrub.Grow it in the shelter of a wall or towards the back of a border.

Abelia x grandiflora is an easy evergreen shrub to grow. Picture: istock/PA
Abelia x grandiflora is an easy evergreen shrub to grow. Picture: istock/PA

Choisya x dewitteana Aztec pearl is fully hardy, evergreen, and flowers in May and often late summer. It can also be grown in partial shade. The leaves get damaged by exposure to strong winds or frost, but this won’t kill the plant.

Pyracantha is fully hardy and evergreen, with small white flowers in late spring and fantastic berries in autumn that attract birds and wildlife.

All three shrubs are easy to care for and can be pruned to keep their shape.

If a shrub has got too large for its spot, or branches are crossing, dead, diseased or damaged then prune to keep the plants in shape and healthy. You want an open middle so that air can pass through the shrub, to help prevent pests and diseases.

9. Don’t over water

If a plant needs water it’ll wilt or have flowers hanging down. If in doubt, dig a small ‘pit’ next to the plant and fill with water – see how quickly the water drains away.



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