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Inverness pupils from Milton of Leys Primary School get an activity morning prize from High Life Highland (HLH) after Grace Mackenzie named the River Ness hydroelectric generator as Hydro Ness


By Ian Duncan

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Grace Mackenzie, who named Hydro Ness, and her classmates enjoy their prize of a sports/activity session.
Grace Mackenzie, who named Hydro Ness, and her classmates enjoy their prize of a sports/activity session.

High Life Highland (HLH) treated pupils at Milton of Leys Primary School to an activity morning.

A P7 pupil from the school, Grace Mackenzie, was successful in a Highland Council competition to name the River Ness hydroelectric generator as Hydro Ness.

Not only has her idea been immortalised in steel but her friends from her class were able to enjoy the benefits with an activity morning filled with fun and team games thanks to HLH.

Councillor Karl Rosie, the chairman of the council’s Climate Change Committee, said: “I am delighted to hear Grace and her classmates enjoyed their day – Inverness Leisure Centre is a superb community asset and it’s really exciting to see it benefit from green energy supplied by Hydro Ness.

“I know the project team were delighted with the name and poster submitted by Grace and it’s great to see students across Highland taking an interest in this project and the wider climate agenda. Thanks to our colleagues at High Life Highland for organising such a great day.”

Hydro Ness will generate on average 550,000 kWh of renewable energy each year with an Archimedes Screw powered by the running waters of the River Ness.

As water flows into the Hydro, it will pass through spiral blades forcing the screw to turn. Energy generated from the movement will be converted into electricity using a generator.

The project supplies about 50 per cent of the electricity demand of the nearby Inverness Leisure Centre, operated by High Life Highland.

The hydroelectric scheme, which became fully operational in March, will be open to the public in late July, with an interpretive visitor experience for people to learn more about the power of hydroelectricity.


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