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New season sees change at helm of Nairn Museum


By Federica Stefani

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Doug Maclean and Annie MacDonald.
Doug Maclean and Annie MacDonald.

Nairn Museum has appointed a new chair and administrator to kick off the summer season.

Doug Maclean, who has worked at the museum as a front-of-house volunteer, joined the board of directors and has been elected as chair of the board, chairing his first board meeting earlier this month.

Until recently he was chair of Groam House Museum on the Black Isle, where he continues to be a trustee. Mr Maclean takes over from Iain Bain, who recently stepped down after serving the museum for 25 years.

“There is such a wealth of knowledge and experience around the table, that is so important not to lose”, Mr Maclean said.

Annie MacDonald has also joined the museum as administrator, a role she will initially hold in the summer months.

Annie MacDonald and Doug Maclean at the museum.
Annie MacDonald and Doug Maclean at the museum.

Ms MacDonald has considerable experience of working in the heritage sector and has specialised in creating podcasts which tell the history and folklore of Scotland.

Museum manager Melissa Davies, stepped down as museum manager at the start of the year, with the museum wishing her the best for the future and thanking her for her contribution in the past years.

The role will be temporarily covered by Jenny Rose-Miller, who served as museum manager previously and has returned on a voluntary basis.

For the coming season, Mr Maclean hopes to organise workshops with the directors and the museum’s many dedicated volunteers, to explore how everyone involved in the running of the museum would like to see it develop over the coming years.

“Some degree of change is inevitable”, he added.

Annie MacDonald with Jenny Rose-Miller.
Annie MacDonald with Jenny Rose-Miller.

“Like so many independent museums in the Highlands, it is running at a deficit, and this obviously cannot continue.

“The museum is looking at how it can attract more visitors and maximise the income from them.”

The D-day exhibit at the museum displays Nairn's contribution to the historic event.
The D-day exhibit at the museum displays Nairn's contribution to the historic event.

To this end, Ms Rose-Miller has developed an exhibition to commemorate the D-Day landings, and the involvement of Nairn in the preparations for these, which should be a draw to the local community as well as of interest to visitors.


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