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New director appointed to Ness District Salmon Fishery Board ready to face challenges of global salmon crisis


By Neil MacPhail

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Brian Shaw.
Brian Shaw.

A new river director has been appointed to the Ness District Salmon Fishery Board’s 2000 sq miles network of rivers and lochs.

With the area’s associated environmental stresses, Brian Shaw, latterly senior biologist to the Spey Salmon Fishery Board, said: “There will be challenges but I’m ready for them.

“It’s a hugely challenging time for the wild salmon sector, but it is an opportunity to engage with other stakeholders in the Ness system in working to deliver some of the solutions.”

Neil Cameron, the Ness Salmon Fishery Board’s new chairman, said: “Brian brings a fresh view as well as considerable insight and expertise to the Ness. We’re delighted to have recruited him and his track record suggests he can play a vital role as we all work together to face up to the local effects of a global salmon crisis.”

Mr Shaw succeeds Chris Conroy who moved to another job.

Born in Grantown, where his father was gamekeeper at Lochindorb, Mr Shaw gained a biology degree at Stirling University.

He worked in the fish farming sector including being production manager of a seafood company in Stornoway.

He returned to the wild fish sector as senior biologist and administrator of the Ayrshire Rivers Trust for seven years until taking up the Spey post in January 2012.

He said: “My prime interests have always been wild fish and environmental issues.

“There are issues to be worked through in relation to renewable energy developments as well as the Caledonian Canal’s proximity.

“My aim is to establish good relations with people to discuss the best ways to make progress. I’ll be working closely with anglers and landlords to drive forward the best future possible for the Ness.”

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