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Mòd described as a 'shot in the arm' for Inverness and Highland business


By Louise Glen

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The massed choirs of the Royal National Mod 2014 provided a wonderful finale to the renowned Gaelic music event. Picture: Alison White. Image No.027174.
The massed choirs of the Royal National Mod 2014 provided a wonderful finale to the renowned Gaelic music event. Picture: Alison White. Image No.027174.

The decision by the organisers of the Royal National Mòd to return to Inverness this year will be a welcome “shot in the arm” for the city’s economic fortunes in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.

The group has announced its intention to bring a “cultural event” to the Highland capital from October 8-16, having had to cancel last year’s Mòd due to the pandemic.

While ongoing uncertainties mean it is unlikely to be on the same scale as previous outings, the fact that it is coming at all has still been warmly welcomed.

Councillor Calum Munro, chairman of Highland Council’s Gaelic committee, said: “After the extremely challenging year that has passed, it is very welcome news that the Royal National Mòd will be coming to Inverness in October.

“It will not be a traditional Mòd with the restrictions placed on it due to Covid, but nonetheless people across Scotland will be delighted to gather in Inverness later on this year to attend and participate in a significant Gaelic cultural event.

“The cultural and language benefits for children in our Highland schools and for adults, Gaelic speakers and learners, will be very welcome – as will the economic impact for Inverness.”

The last time the Royal National Mòd was staged in Inverness, in 2014, it brought an estimated

£3.5 million boost for the local economy.

David Richardson, Highlands and Islands development manager of the Federation of Small Businesses, said: “This will be a shot in the arm that is needed for lots of local businesses.

“Things are very uncertain for business at the moment, so an event in Inverness in October will be good news for everyone.”

Precise details of how the event will work have not yet been released, but An Comunn Gàidhealach chief executive, James Graham, said: “We are working closely with our main stakeholders with the aim of producing an innovative and attractive event – an event which will promote the status of Gaelic and bring enjoyment to viewers and listeners, and which will simultaneously promote the capital city of the Highlands across the world.”

He said preparatory work on the event programme had just started, with plans to publish more details towards the end of next month.

READ: Royal National Mòd 2021 will promote Inverness across the world at a 'different' type of cultural festival


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