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Pupils bury time capsule containing face mask, rainbow flag and The Beano for future generations to find at Inverness Creative Hub


By Val Sweeney

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Crown Primary P7 pupils Erin Mullen, Alex McKean and Tehreem Ali place the capsule in hole at Inverness Creative Academy.
Crown Primary P7 pupils Erin Mullen, Alex McKean and Tehreem Ali place the capsule in hole at Inverness Creative Academy.

Pupils at an Inverness primary school have written letters and parcelled up favourite items to future generations to retrieve in 100 years' time.

P7 pupils at Crown Primary buried a time capsule at the site of the former Inverness Royal Academy which is being redeveloped as the first creative hub in the Highlands.

It contains a selection of objects such as a rainbow flag, a copy of The Beano, a mask, an old iPhone, Pokémon cards, coins, a £5 note and details of pupils' favourite books, films and computer games.

It also includes photographs and letters written to the future finders with instructions to open it in 2121.

The project was organised by Wasps Inverness Creative Academy which has been working with pupils to share some of the building's history and finds such as school milk bottles and Latin homework.

The time capsule includes a copy of The Beano, honey, letters, a mobile phone and face mask.
The time capsule includes a copy of The Beano, honey, letters, a mobile phone and face mask.

Pupil Alannah Dougherty outlined her vision for 2121.

"In 100 years' time, I would like life to be Covid-free, a greater sense of social justice and equality, life to be full of fun, for people to create new things like inventions and for people to have good imaginations to keep improving life in the future," she said.

Alannah, who enjoyed the project and hearing about how life had changed, particularly liked an online meeting with a former Crown pupil who was surprised by what the inside of the school looked like now since she attended in the 1950s.

"I think it’s a good idea to put photos in the time capsule because people will be able to compare and see how things have changed in the future," she said.

"This means they will know the history of Crown which is really important.

"It’s a good thing for the time capsule to happen – people will want to know and see what’s changed."

During the renovation works, contractors Bancon Construction discovered various historic items under the floorboards.

They included a National War Savings Association card, with stamps thought to be about 100 years old, which has been passed to Inverness Museum's conservation team.

The capsule is lowered into place.
The capsule is lowered into place.

Dawn Kane, of Bancon, thanked Crown Primary School for its involvement.

"The time capsule will be safely buried within the structure of the building and while we don't know when it will be discovered, it's now a special part of the project and the history of the building and Inverness," she said.

Related story: Highland artists in the frame for Inverness airport show


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