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Abseil on Forth Rail Bridge raises £34k for cancer charity despite not happening – twice


By Val Sweeney

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Ramsay McGhee presents a cheque for £34.500 to Brian Corr, a member of Prostate Scotland’s medical advisory committee.
Ramsay McGhee presents a cheque for £34.500 to Brian Corr, a member of Prostate Scotland’s medical advisory committee.

A fundraising abseil on the Forth Rail Bridge has raised £34,500 for a cancer charity despite not taking place – twice.

Dozens of freemasons signed up for the event initially due to take place last August to raise money for Prostate Scotland.

But having been cancelled due to the coronavirus lockdown, it was rescheduled for earlier this year.

However, it was called off again because of the launch of a project to create a "Sydney Harbour Bridge" type visitor attraction at the spot from which the abseilers would begin their descent.

Despite the double disappointment, those who had pledged to sponsor the 37 abseiling freemasons and one female generously decided to pay up regardless.

Scotland’s most senior freemason, Grand Master Mason Ramsay McGhee, visited the Maggie’s Centre in the grounds of Raigmore Hospital in Inverness to present the money to Prostate Scotland.

Mr McGhee, who lives on the Black Isle, gave the cheque to Brian Corr, a member of Prostate Scotland’s medical advisory committee and urology clinical nurse specialist at Raigmore Hospital.

Mr McGhee said: "Prostate Scotland is our chosen charity and we have been raising funds for them during the past eight years.

"I’m delighted to say this cheque takes the total giving to Prostate Scotland to £625,000."

Adam Gaines Prostate Scotland’s director said: "We would like to express a huge and heartfelt thank you to the Grand Lodge of Scotland for the most wonderful and magnificent donation of £34,500 towards our work.

"The Grand Lodge of Scotland’s support and partnership from this donation and over the past eight years has made, and is making, such a huge difference to our work to tackle prostate cancer and to create awareness across the nation."

The Forth Rail Bridge project, being carried out by Network Rail, involves the construction of a bridge walk reception hub on the South Queensferry side of the UNESCO World Heritage Site. it will be used for preparing those heading out on the bridge walk and for access.

Related story: New support service for men in the Highlands suffering from prostate cancer


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