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Award-winning Airborne Lens team announced as photography partner for Spirit of the Highlands project at Inverness Castle which is being transformed into tourism attraction


By Val Sweeney

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Liam Anderstrem and Mark Craig, of Airborne Lens. Picture: Airborne Lens.
Liam Anderstrem and Mark Craig, of Airborne Lens. Picture: Airborne Lens.

Airborne Lens, an award-winning team of experienced photographers, filmmakers and drone specialists, has been announced as the successful partner for photography input for the Inverness Castle – Spirit of the Highlands project.

Work has begun at the castle to transform it into a gateway tourist attraction celebrating the spirit of the Highlands.

Spirit:Journeys, part of the project, will be delivered in partnership with VisitScotland and aims to deliver benefits for local communities, helping to unlock economic potential and improve visitor experiences across the region.

It will encourage people to visit all parts of the Highlands in a sustainable way.

Airborne Lens has been contracted to provide 1000 photographic stills reflecting the diverse natural and cultural heritage of the Highland and Islands based on the twin themes of the individual and the landscape.

The images will be used in promotional material, online platforms and partner media channels for marketing and interpretive purposes.

Airborne Lens has been creating iconic imagery and digital content for over 20 years from all over Scotland for clients including VisitScotland, National Trust for Scotland, Historic Environment Scotland, BBC and Scottish Forestry.

Most recently, the company worked on a photographic series to support Scotland's UNESCO Trail including North West Highlands Geopark and Wester Ross Biosphere.

Fiona Hampton, director for the Inverness Castle – Spirit of the Highlands project said: "This is a significant step forward in the progress of the Spirit:Journeys project and we are very much looking forward to working with the Airborne Lens team to capture images of the people and landscape that make this special part of the world."

Liam Anderstrem, the company’s founder, said Airborne Lens was "very excited" to work with High Life Highland on the Spirit:Journeys project.

"I have spent many years photographing countries all over the world for hotel and airline clients, but nothing compares to the diverse landscapes, culture and people of the Scottish Highlands and Islands," he said.

Chris Taylor, regional leadership director at VisitScotland, said: "The Highlands is a photographer’s playground and we can’t wait to see what Airborne Lens captures for this exciting project, which will help encourage visitors to stay longer, visit all year round and explore more widely.

"Tourism is a force for good; creating economic and social value in every corner of Scotland and enhancing well-being."

The delivery of Spirit:Journeys is supported through the Natural and Cultural Heritage Fund led by NatureScot and part-funded by the European Regional Development Fund.

An image of how Inverness Castle will look following its transformation.
An image of how Inverness Castle will look following its transformation.

The transformation of Inverness Castle is supported by £15 million Scottish Government and £3 million UK Government investment through the Inverness and Highland City Region Deal.

The Inverness and Highland City Region deal is a joint initiative supported by up to £315m investment from the UK and Scottish governments, Highland Council, Highlands and Islands Enterprise and University of the Highlands and Islands, aimed at stimulating sustainable regional economic growth.

The transformation of the castle will create a gateway for Highland tourism, contributing to reinvigoration of tourism across the area and providing much needed investment for the industry to aid the recovery from the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Photography and filming tenders advertised for Spirit of the Highlands project


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