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Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) issues three flood alerts for parts of the Highlands - including Inverness, the Great Glen, Ross-shire and Skye


By Philip Murray

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Surface flooding is a risk, Sepa has warned (Stock image).. Picture: Gary Anthony.
Surface flooding is a risk, Sepa has warned (Stock image).. Picture: Gary Anthony.

Widespread showers and longer spells of heavy rain have sparked flood alerts for the Highlands.

The Scottish Environment Protection Agency (Sepa) has issued three alerts in the Highlands, covering areas that include Inverness, the Black Isle, the Great Glen and wider River Ness catchment, all of Ross-shire, Skye, Raasay, the Small Isles, and Lochaber.

A Sepa spokesperson said: "Showers and longer periods of rain are expected in the area during Thursday, these may be locally heavy which could cause flooding impacts from surface water and small watercourses.

"The onset of flooding could be fast where the heaviest downpours occur. Particularly at risk are urban areas and the transport network, including localised flooding to low-lying land and roads, with difficult driving conditions possible.

"Extra care should be taken if spending time in the outdoors on or near watercourses as water levels could rise rapidly."

Although no Met Office weather warnings have been issued, the heavy rain and forecasts for strong winds have already prompted some disruption, with ScotRail restricting speed limits for services on the Kyle and West Highland lines from 6pm on Thursday until 10am on Friday.

For the latest flood alert and flood warning updates in your area, visit Sepa’s Floodline website at https://floodline.sepa.org.uk/floodupdates.

READ MORE: Rain and strong winds spark reduced speeds on Kyle Line, ScotRail warns train passengers

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