Counting down to the Courier's 200th anniversary

Two centuries of The Inverness Courier

IC 200, Inverness Courier

ON December 4, The Inverness Courier will reach the 200th anniversary of its first publication.

As the milestone in the paper's history approaches, we are undertaking a 200-day countdown highlighting some of the headlines on a year-by-year basis starting with the very first front page.

New developments proposed for Inverness in 1961

IC 200, Inverness Courier

A NEW bridge over the River Ness opened in September replacing the old suspension bridge which had been demolished two years previously as it was unsuitable to carry modern traffic into the town.

BBC announce the arrival of television in 1956

IC 200, Inverness Courier

IN 1956 it was announced that the North would have television within a year. "Speaking on Saturday at the opening of the second Ideal Homes and Trades Exhibition, which is being held at the Northern Meeting

Loch Ness Monster seen again in 1954

IC 200, Inverness Courier

A GAMEKEEPER in 1954 spotted Nessie while at work by the water. "The Loch Ness Monster was seen at the mouth of the River Moriston about halfway down Loch Ness, at the weekend by Mr Peter MacMillan, the

Queen Mother visits Inverness in 1953

IC 200, Inverness Courier

QUEEN Elizabeth the Queen Mother paid a visit to Inverness on August 6, 1953 to receive the Freedom of the Burgh. "In the afternoon she attended the ceremony at which Freedom was conferred upon the Town

Ambitious hydro scheme completed in 1950

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Developments to harness the power of water in the Highlands boomed during the post-war years. The Conon scheme included the creation of a three-mile tunnel from Loch Fannich to carry 370 million gallons a day to a generating station at Grudie Bridge.

Royals make historic visit to Inverness in 1948

IC 200, Inverness Courier

An estimated 80,000 people packed into Inverness to welcome King VI and Queen Elizabeth. It was the first time the couple, accompanied by Princess Margaret, had visited the Highland capital since their coronation.

Big freeze of 1947 heralds hardships

IC 200, Inverness Courier

Inverness experienced 15 degrees of frost as Britain found itself in the grip of severe wintry weather. There was wide-ranging disruption including electricity cuts due to difficulties in getting coal to power stations while fuel was also in short supply.

Squatters occupy empty military buildings in 1946 due to housing shortage

Former servicemen returning home to Inverness following the end of World War II turned to squatting with their families due to a shortage of permanent accommodation. Squatting colonies in unused military and Air Ministry huts sprang up at various sites around the town including the Longman Aerodrome, Raigmore Wood, Annfield Road, Porterfield Road and Muirtown

Celebrations in 1945 mark the end of World War II

IC 200, Inverness Courier

People across the Highlands joined in the nationwide celebrations in May to mark victory in Europe. In scenes repeated in every other town and city, people packed into the streets of Inverness to rejoice at the news that after six years, the fighting was finally over.

Cinema opens in Inverness in 1912

IC 200, Inverness Courier

THE first cinematograph pictures were shown in the new Central Hall Picture House in Academy Street at a grand opening for invited guests in December.

Inverness Town Hall opened by the Duke of Edinburgh in 1882

IC 200, Inverness Courier

RESIDENTS and businesses in Inverness were suddenly spurred into getting out the banners and bunting in January following the surprise revelation that Queen Victoria's second son, Alfred - the Duke of Edinburgh - would officially open the new Inverness Town House.

Councillors reject Army claim to Inverness land in 1872

IC 200, Inverness Courier

THE ownership of a parcel of land in the Longman area of Inverness was in question when an Army officer called at the Inverness Town Council offices asking to see the town charters or any documents relating to the site once occupied by Cromwell's Fort.

New pier opens on Loch Ness in 1857

IC 200, Inverness Courier

THE opening of Temple Pier near Drumnadrochit was hailed as a significant development both for boat passengers travelling along the Caledonian Canal as well as developing trade links in the area.

Kirk splits in 1843

IC 200, Inverness Courier

THE so-called disruption in the established Church of Scotland reverberated across the country including the Highlands.

Improvements to Inverness Museum planned in 1836

IC 200, Inverness Courier

SINCE being established a decade earlier, the museum had built up a growing collection of items including coins, minerals and on one occasion had even been presented with a live alligator by former Inverness man John Fraser who moved to Charleston, Carolina, where he was a merchant.

Burke hanged for murder in 1829

IC 200, Inverness Courier

THE notorious series of murders carried out by William Burke and William Hare in Edinburgh horrified and enthralled people across the country including the Highlands.

Gas and water supplies to be improved in 1828

IC 200, Inverness Courier

THE River Ness was turning into a common sewer and causing great inconvenience to the many families who did not live nearby as well as being time consuming for servants fetching water, according to a report in July.

New King of France anointed in 1825

IC 200, Inverness Courier

CROWDS besieged the cathedral of Reims early on May 29 for the coronation of King Charles X, according to a report in The Inverness Courier's Foreign Intelligence column.

Travel by boat booms in 1824

IC 200, Inverness Courier

WATER transport was the easiest mode of travel for reaching many destinations in the early 19th century and the opening of the Caledonian Canal in 1822 led to increased opportunities.

Inverness estate for sale in 1821

IC 200, Inverness Courier

AS well as providing a vital news service, The Inverness Courier was also important for traders and businesses to promote their goods and services.

Inverness Harbour enjoys continued growth in 1818

IC 200, Inverness Courier

THE port played an important role in the town's trade and economic growth. Wool was an important foreign export and the textile industry contributed to the further development of the Highland capital during the 18th century.

Newspaper launched in 1817

IC 200, Inverness Courier

THE first edition of The Inverness Courier rolled off the press on December 4, 1817, after receiving the backing of subscribers including mainly booksellers, bankers and postmasters in the town.